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An Alpine Symphony - photos and reviews

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Sir Andrew Davis’ highly anticipated return to Melbourne delighted critics, with The Australian praising him to the ‘technically audacious and stylistically eclectic program that built steadily in emotional intensity’.

The Orchestra was joined by the Chorus for a performance of Vaughan Williams’ Serenade to Music, which was followed by Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto, performed by violin superstar Ray Chen, and Strauss’ An Alpine Symphony.



Rehearsal with Sir Andrew Davis




‘Sir Andrew conducting this music was as smooth as riding through Yorkshire in a Rolls Royce.’

ArtsHub


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Photo by Daniel Aulsebrook


‘Ray Chen brought his own brand of individuality to Tchaikovsky’s quintessentially Romantic work. Technical virtuosity and emotional breadth characterized the first movement, which culminated in a climax of such excitement that sustained applause was the inevitable result. Following an emotionally charged second movement Andante, strongly marked rhythmic suspensions and stresses alternated with harmonics of piercing silvered purity for a Finale that raced to the finish line with brilliant bravura.’

Classic Melbourne


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Photo by Daniel Aulsebrook


‘Davis and Chen maintained a near-faultless partnership, the violinist responsive to his accompaniment while carving out an interpretation of breadth and originality.’

The Age


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Photo by Daniel Aulsebrook


‘Eclipsing all before it, the Strauss rose with organic fury under Davis’s baton, Night’s opening rumblings kept as jittery, primordial whispers and so heightening the triumphant burst of Sunrise. The 22 movements trace the journey of an alpine ascent and descent, with dramatic changes of scenery and climate along the way, various perils for the expedition team, and the humility-inducing grandeur of the view from the summit. Alert to each imagery shift and adroitly balancing the vast orchestral forces before him, Davis kept intensity bubbling away, even as textures shifted unpredictably from massed splendour to simple sonorities.’

The Australian



Ray Chen preparing for an interview with ABC Radio National’s Books and Arts program. Hear the interview here.